ACCORDING TO THE U.S. BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 60 MILLION MEN ARE REPORTED TO SUFFER FROM HAIRLOSS, THAT’S 20% OF THE POPULATION. WHAT ABOUT WOMEN? THE NUMBER OF WOMEN EXPERIENCING ADVANCED THINNING IS PROJECTED AT 40 MILLION.

Introduction

Your hair loss may have started with a few extra hairs in the sink or in your comb. But now you can’t look in the mirror without seeing more of your scalp. Baldness typically refers to excessive hair loss from your scalp, and can be the result of heredity, certain medications, or an underlying medical condition. Anyone – men, women and children- can experience hair loss.

Some people prefer to let their baldness run its course untreated and unhidden. Others may cover it up with hairstyles, makeup, hats or scarves. And still others choose one of the medications and surgical procedures that are available to treat baldness. Before pursuing an of these treatment options, talk with your doctor about the cause of and best possible treatments for your hair loss.

Signs and Symptoms

The medical term for hair loss is alopecia. Pattern baldness (androgenetic alopecia) the most common type of alopecia, affects roughly one-third of men and women. It’s typically permanent. Another type of alopecia, alopecia areata, can be temporary. It can involve hair loss on your scalp or other parts of your body.

Androgenetic alopecia

Having androgenetic alopecia may mean you experience hair loss as early as during your teen years. For men, this type of baldness is typically characterized by hair loss that begins at the temples and crown. The end result may be partial or complete baldness. Women with androgenetic alopecia usually have hair loss limited to thinning at the front, sides, or crown. Complete baldness rarely occurs in women.

Alopecia areata

With alopecia areata, baldness usually occurs in small, round, smooth patches. You may lose only scalp hair, or you may lose body hair as well.

Causes

About 90 percent of the hair on people’s scalps is in a two-to six- year growth (anagen) stage at any given time. The other 10 percent is in a two-to three-month resting (telogen) phase, after which time it is shed. Most people shed 50 to 150 hairs a day. Once a hair is shed, the growth stage begins again as a new hair from the same follicle replaces the shed hair. New hair grows at a rate of approximately one- half inch each month. Hair loss may lead to baldness when the rate of shedding exceeds the rate of regrowth, when new hair is thinner than the hair shed or when hair comes out in patches.

What causes androgenetic alopecia

Androgenetic alopecia is caused by heredity. Although it’s most common among men, it can also affect women. A history of androgenetic alopecia on either side of your family increases your risk of balding. Heredity also affects the age at which you begin to lose hair and the developmental speed, pattern, and extent of your baldness.

What causes alopecia areata

Alopecia areata is classified as an autoimmune disease, but the cause is unknown. People who develop this type of baldness are generally in good health. Some scientists believe that some people are genetically predisposed to develop alopecia areata and that a trigger, such as a virus or something else in the environment, sets off the condition. A family history of the alopecia areata makes you more likely to develop it. With alopecia areata, your hair generally grows back, but you may lose and regrow your hair a number of times.

Other causes of temporary hair loss include: